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Late onset multiple sclerosis is associated with more severe ventricle expansion

  • Author Footnotes
    1 Equally contributing authors.
    Dejan Jakimovski
    Footnotes
    1 Equally contributing authors.
    Affiliations
    Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center, Department of Neurology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Equally contributing authors.
    Dora Dujmic
    Footnotes
    1 Equally contributing authors.
    Affiliations
    Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center, Department of Neurology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA
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  • Jesper Hagemeier
    Affiliations
    Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center, Department of Neurology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA
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  • Deepa P. Ramasamy
    Affiliations
    Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center, Department of Neurology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA
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  • Niels Bergsland
    Affiliations
    Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center, Department of Neurology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA

    IRCCS, Fondazione Don Carlo Gnocchi ONLUS, Milan, Italy
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  • Michael G. Dwyer
    Affiliations
    Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center, Department of Neurology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA

    Center for Biomedical Imaging at Clinical Translational Science Institute, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA
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  • Svetlana Eckert
    Affiliations
    Jacobs Comprehensive MS Treatment and Research Center, Department of Neurology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA
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  • Channa Kolb
    Affiliations
    Jacobs Comprehensive MS Treatment and Research Center, Department of Neurology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA
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  • Alexis Lizarraga
    Affiliations
    Jacobs Comprehensive MS Treatment and Research Center, Department of Neurology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA
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  • David Hojnacki
    Affiliations
    Jacobs Comprehensive MS Treatment and Research Center, Department of Neurology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA
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  • Bianca Weinstock-Guttman
    Affiliations
    Jacobs Comprehensive MS Treatment and Research Center, Department of Neurology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA
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  • Robert Zivadinov
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author: Robert Zivadinov, MD, PhD, FAAN, FEAN, FANA, Center for Biomedical Imaging at Clinical Translational Science Institute, Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center, Department of Neurology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, 100 High Street, Buffalo, NY 14203. Phone: 716-859-7040; Fax: 716-859-7066.
    Affiliations
    Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center, Department of Neurology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA

    Center for Biomedical Imaging at Clinical Translational Science Institute, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Equally contributing authors.
Published:October 16, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.msard.2020.102588

      Highlights

      • Persons with late-onset multiple sclerosis (PwLOMS) have faster disability accrual than matched adult-onset MS (AOMS)
      • PwLOMS had significantly greater MSSS scores to AOMS
      • PwLOMS have greater ventricular expansion when compared to adult-onset MS

      Abstract

      Background

      Late-onset multiple sclerosis (LOMS) is associated with faster disability progression than persons with adult-onset MS (PwAOMS). The differences in brain atrophy are currently unknown.

      Objectives

      To determine MRI-derived atrophy rates in persons with late-onset MS (PwLOMS) and compare them to an age-matched and disease duration-matched sample of PwAOMS.

      Methods

      870 persons with MS (290 PwLOMS, 290 age-matched PwAOMS, and 290 disease duration-matched PwAOMS), and 150 healthy controls (HCs), were followed for 5 years and 3 years, respectively. Cross-sectional and longitudinal measures of T2-lesion volume (LV), lateral ventricular volume (LVV) and whole brain volume (WBV) were derived. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (MSSS) were calculated. Both analyses were corrected for false discovery rate.

      Results

      Persons with MS exhibited significantly greater annualized WBV loss (-0.88% vs. -0.38%, p<0.001) and annualized LVV expansion (3.1% vs. 1.7%, p=0.002) when compared to HCs. PwLOMS had significantly higher baseline and follow-up median MSSS when compared to both age-matched and disease duration-matched PwAOMS (p<0.026). PwLOMS showed significantly greater percent LVV change (14.3% vs. 9.3% p=0.001) and greater annualized percent LVV change (4.1% vs. 1.6%, p<0.001) compared to age-matched PwAOMS.

      Conclusion

      PwLOMS had higher MSSS and greater ventricle expansion when compared to PwAOMS.

      Keywords

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